Mon. May 27th, 2024

Zarina Hashmi was famous all over the world for attractive woodcuts and intaglio prints, Google celebrating 86th birthday
Zarina Hashmi 86th Birth Anniversary Google is celebrating Zarina Hashmi’s 86th birthday today. Zarina was born on 16 July 1937 in Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh (UP). Before partition, Zarina lived in India with her four siblings. But after the partition of the country in 1947, Zarina had to live with her family in Karachi, Pakistan.

Zarina Hashmi 86th Birth Anniversary: If you have seen today’s Google, you must have seen a graphic of a beautiful woman in her doodle. After seeing this, your interest must have increased that who is this woman? The name of this woman is Zarina Hashmi and Google is celebrating her 86th birthday today. Zarina was born on 16 July 1937 in Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh.

Zarina used to live in India before partition
Before partition, Zarina lived in India with her four siblings. But, after the partition of the country in 1947, Zarina had to live with her family in Karachi, Pakistan. At the age of just 21, Zarina was married to a young diplomat. Soon after marriage, he got a chance to travel the world. It is from here that Zarina, who has traveled to Bangkok, Paris and Japan, informs her printmaking and modernist and abstract art tendencies


Zarina went to live in New York in 1977. Here she came in support of women artists and gradually became a member of the Heresies Collective. It was a feminist magazine that examined the relationship between politics, the arts, and social justice.


Within no time, Zarina became a professor at the New York Feminist Art Institute. It was only after becoming a professor that he supported women artists to get equal education. Co-curated an exhibition titled ‘Dialectics of Isolation: An Exhibition of Third World Women Artists of the United States’ at the gallery of All India Radio in the 1980s.

Hashmi became internationally known for her striking woodcuts and intaglio prints, which consisted of semi-abstract images of the houses and cities where she lived. His work often included inscriptions in his native Urdu and geometric elements inspired by Islamic art.

People around the world continue to behold Hashemi’s art in the permanent collections of prestigious galleries, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, among others.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *